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the spinach reference. how much damage is there to the economy from in bill? >> well, i prefer the least rotten apple than spinach. i think that the two big problems here, people who believe that the rich should pay more do not understand the effects of marginal rates. when you raise marginal rates-- >> the next dollar of income that you earn. >> right, it lowers the incentive of the people that you want it take risk and to innovate and to create. that's one problem. so it will affect the growth of the economy. the other problem is, it does affect tax revenues. the guys with the green eye shades say well if we raise the taxes this much, we'll get this much more revenue. if you lower the incentive of people to take risk, generally what happens, revenue does not come in. >> paul: you don't get as much as you think you'll do. >> exactly. >> here, mary, look, the economy seemed, the stock market loved it, the hs blew out the next day and up based on the prospect that something would get done. housing markets recovering. i mean, the economy, the job market not great still, 155,000 new jobs, b
in the economy. so are they right? does this new payroll tax hike mean less spending and a weaker economy? hi, everyone, i'm brenda buttner, this is bulls and bears, here they are, the bulls and bears this week, gary b smith, tobin smith, jonas max ferris along with walker stableton and steffen, gary b. it turns out not just the rich, but the payroll tax hike smacking just about all workers, will it smack the economy next? >> i don't see how it can't, brenda. the person in tt little clip summed it up perfectly. it makes a little bit of a difference and a little bit of a difference times a few hundred million people makes a big difference. it's already been studied by economists, they predict 4 to 500,000 jobs lost, 1/2% lopped off the the gdp. if you look around the studio there, everyone that gets a paycheck, like they said in that little clip, sees less he money. that's less money they were going to spend on groceries, at the drug store, the gas station and that money gets sucked out of the economy, so do jobs. >> brenda: well, now, this does hit lower and middle class americans harder beca
will the global economy go next and what will it mean to your portfolio as the u.s. stock market sets a new five-year high. >>> i'll have any candid conversation with outspoken jpmorgan chase ceo jamie dimon. we'll talk real estate, banking, his pay cut. >> we had run terrible year. >>> and she's called the oprah of china. remarkable entrepreneur who runs a media empire and reaches more than 200 million people a month. "on the money" begins right now. >>> this is america's number one financial news program, "on the money." now, maria bartiromo. >> this is what's making news as we head into a new week "on the money." washington has a new watchdog for wall street. president obama has nominated mary jo white the head of securities and exchange commission. white is a former prosecutor with a reputation for toughness. she will replace mary schapiro and must still be confirmed by the senate. timothy geithner spent his last day as secretary on friday, stepping down after a tumultuous four years in the financial system. president obama's chief of staff jack lew has been nominated to replace geithner. >>
everyone. i'm susie gharib. the economy is barely growing, so the federal reserve says it will keep buying bonds to stimulate growth, and create more jobs. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. facebook's latest earnings beat the street, but while the company saw big gains in mobile ad sales, it's costs also shot up. >> susie: and rim, rolls out the new blackberry 10, a new name, and a new ticker symbol, we look at what's riding on all those bold moves. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the federal reserve said the economy "paused" in recent months, so it's keeping its key interest rate near zero. the decision from policymakers today came on a day of mixed reports about the u.s. economy. on the jobs front, a strong payrolls report showed private employers added 192,000 jobs in january, much more than economists expected. but the commerce department said economic growth, contracted in the last three months of 2012. the g.d.p. shrank by 0.1% the first time that's happened since the financial crisis began. the fed said in its policy statement today that it continues to see "downside risk
the economy, about where the markets would go post financial crisis. what's next for america and the global economy? ken rogoff joining me once again with some answers. ken, good to see you. >> good to see you. >> thanks so much for joining us. how would you describe the mood in davos and how would you see the economy today five years post the crisis? >> it's a strange mood in davos, where people are not euphoric. in fact, you talk to heads of multinational corporations, businesspeople around the world, they say, you know, things aren't even as good as i thought they would be this quarter, but they're calmer. there's a feeling that the world is not going to fall apart. you hear more about geopolitical risk, cyber security, d less about europe's going to blow up tomorrow. >> so, you're not seeing over enthusiasm but it's certainly better than a year ago? >> yes, it's definitely, definitely calmer. their theme here is resilient. yes, and dynamism, not so much. guess what i thought about the global economy. i actually think that growth will be moderate with not necessarily a lot of volatility
many reasons, especially the fact i think it's harmful to the economy. i guess my point, paul, would be i don't see republicans had much choice. i mean, you talk to john boehner and you talk to mitch mcconnell for six, seven weeks the president would simply not budge one inch on cutting spending and had no interest in doing that. the republicans believed and i think they're probably right if they'd gone into 2013 without the tax issue resolved they'd be pummelled day after
is there to the economy from this bill? >> i prefer the least rotten apple. [ laughter ] >> i think two big problems here. people who believe that the rich should pay more do not understand the effects of marginal rates. >> dollar of income you earn? >> it lower the incentives that you want people to take risks and to create. the other problem is, it does affect tax revenues. the guys with the green eye shades, if you raise the taxes we'll get this much more in revenue but if you lower the incentive of people to take risks generally that revenue doesn't come in. >> paul: so you don't get as much as you think. mary, the economy seems to be -- the stock market loved this. they blew out the next day and based on the prospect something would get done. how long go market is recovering. the economy and job market still not great, 155,000 new jobs, but the economy does seem to be doing okay. >> i think that is probably okay. the economy will do okay. but when you have an unemployment at 7.8% and really stubbornly not budging, you want to do something that something more for the economy than just okay, muddling
that we can put it behind us and focus on just growing our economy. >> the plan would permanently raise taxes on households making more than $450,000 while continuing tax breaks from businesses and extend unemployment benefits through 2013 and keep popular tax credits for middle class families until 2018. a decision on spending cuts has been delayed until march. stock markets begin the new year on wednesday when washington will find out what wall street thinks of congress' last ditch compromise. >> we will talk more about this latest deal. for that i am joined by our business correspondent. as we heard hard fought compromise in the senate at least but not everybody seems to be too satisfied. >> it is a compromise. both sides had to withdraw from their original positions. democrats wanted to raise taxes for yearly family incomes starting at $25,000. now it has been pushed to $450,000. if you look at the republicans they preferred to not raise any taxes at all. that idea did not succeed at all. but there is a feeling of relief that the deal has been reached. you have to keep in mind the c
the japanese economy. the prime minister says he plans to decide on a fiscal 2013 draft budget within this month. he also confirmed he will submit a large scale supplementary budget to the diet for quick enactment. abe says he wants the two budgets to finance spending seamlessly over the next 15 months to restore a strong economy. he also says the bank of japan should adopt bold monetary policies in close coordination with his government. >> translator: the bank of japan's monetary policy is critically important in terms of foreign exchange rates and in achieving a 2% inflation target. i strongly expect the central bank to act responsibly. >> prime minister abe also spoke about nuclear power. he indicated his government will consider allowing utilities to build new plants. >> translator: the government will go over what we've learned about the nuclear accident and check the progress of nuclear safety technology. i would like to carefully consider whether new plants can be built and it will take a certain amount of time. >> on diplomacy, abe said he'll give top priority to strengthenin
continues to see "downside risks" to the economy. unemployment is still "elevated". but household and business spending advanced. >> susie: darren gersh begins our coverage with that weak reading on the economy. >> reporter: last quarter, defense spending fell off the fiscal cliff. as lawmakers bickered, manufacturers who make things for the pentagon cut back production sharply-- defense spending fell 22% in the latest g.d.p. report, tipping the economy into the red. >> certainly manufacturers are pulling back and i think this is a bit of a wake up call that these cuts are real and that they have real effects on the economy. >> reporter: economists and markets did not panic over the drop into the red, because the economy is still showing signs of solid growth. businesses are still buying equipment and software. housing continues to bounce back. and consumer spending held up well, expanding at an annual rate of 2.2%. >> so if you look through some of the volatile components, demand underneath was solid and it doesn't suggest the economy is losing momentum. so a scary headline numb
that the economy created 155,000 new jobs for the month. that was slightly below expectations. the unemployment rate stands at 7.8%, which is actually unchanged from november because november was revised upward to 7.8%, as well. well, after a painful and protracted battle in government, president obama signed a compromise bill avoiding the fiscal cliff. it makes the bush era tax cuts permanent except for individualses with incomes over $400,000. it also extends jobless benefits for the long-term unemployed, allows the payroll tax holiday to expire which, by the way, raises social security taxes by 2% for everybody. the measure increases taxes on capital gains and dividends to 20% to those making other than $400,000. reaction from business was fierce. >> it's amazing how the politicians on both sides of the aisle were talking about how the bill to address the fiscal cliff needed to be balanced, and what came out couldn't have been more imbalanced by definition but nothing but tax increases. >> we have to get something within a couple of months because all we did was push the cataclysm out a coup
." and he would say "why would we want to be doing that now? that's actually going to hurt the economy." >> but hasn't our economy changed so much since franklin roosevelt simply put people on the government payroll? >> it's, economics, the underlying rules change a lot more slowly than people imagine. people look and they say, "oh, you know, back then they were taking ocean liners and now we fly jet airplanes." or, "back then we didn't have a global economy." actually, we did. it's a little bit fancier now. but the basic rules are not are not much changed. it takes hundreds of years for those to change a whole lot. and this is, i can pretty easily assemble a bunch of headlines from the 1930s and they will sound like they're right out of today's headlines. this is the same kind of animal that we confronted in the '30s. this is depression economics. and the nature of the solution is not really very different now from what it was then. >> what do you mean, depression economics? >> well, two things really. one is, a recession is when the economy's going down. a depression is when the econ
tremendous economic financial pressure on the entire global economy, including europe. >> in the same way in which the collapse of lehman implied global shocks, a dissolve in the situation of the eurozone is going to impact the united states. >> while everyone is telling the germans, "bail these guys out now," the germans are saying, "if we're gonna bail them out, we wanna fix the political crisis." >> at the end of the day, europe and the eurozone face an existential question: can we become the united states of europe? >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about th
your small business. sign up for your free trial today at constantcontact.com/try. >> the economy is shrinking and the economy is playing the blame game. charles: welcome, everyone, i am charles payne in for neil cavuto. the administration is saying that it was hurricane sandy and defense spending cuts and uncertainty about marcotte. one more quarter and we are in a double dip recession with us tonight is xander -- sandra smith. >> that's right, they are trying to use this report. uncertainty when it comes to tax dollars in borrowing more money. charles: the mass media, i saw a report in new york. six reasons this wasn't a bad record. did you see that? >> the media was trying to spin this in every way that they could. they were trying to make it look like a god for them. what we need to do is say that as a lack of economic growth policy. where is the job growth policies? right now we have consumer confidence levels that we just got this week. they are plummeting because people are seeing their paychecks shrink as a result of the expirations of payroll tax cuts. people have less mo
the economy. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." japanese government is following through on its promises to give the economy a shot in the arm. government leaders have agreed on a stimulus package worth $115 billion. they hope to boost growth by 2%. the government will allocate the funds to three areas. more than $40 billion will go to rebuilding after the earthquake and tsunami and to disaster prevention. workers will use the funds repairing infrastructure such as tunnels and bridges. about $35 billion will be spent on measures to ensure security and revitalized communities. and about $35 billion will be spent on driving growth. some of that will support business ventures. other funds will go into promoting joint research projects between universities and companies. stimulus package plus spending by local governments and the private sector will add up to $230 billion. >> translator: governments under the democratic party focused only on redistribution. they didn't make enough effort to increase incomes and expand the economy. i'm determined to change the basic philosophy. i'm going to b
fiscal action that will push the economy back into recession. that was one of the risks that the fiscal cliff posed. the challenge is to achieve long run sustainability without unduly hampering the recovery which we have. the deal that was struck together with the previous work in 2011 that involved some spending cuts made some progress in both of these goals. sustainability still abil over the decade we have seen improvement in the debt to gdp ratio. there's more work to be done, but some progress there. and in the short run, the fiscal cliff deal on new year's eliminated a good bit of the restrictive components of the fiscal policy that would have had such adverse effects. not completely, but at least a good start. there was a bit of progress on both of these goals, very importantly. i hasten to say that we're not out of the woods, because we are approaching a number of other physical and critical watershed's coming up. we've got the funding of the government, the so-called sequestered, which is a set of automatic spending cuts that were delayed by two months as part of the fiscal cli
to grow the economy, shrink government and create confidence that we are not greece. and, oh, heck, my friend steve kroft lobbed a bunch of softballs at president obama and hillary clinton in his "60 minutes" interview last night. and you know what, folks, we still do not know what happened on that tragic, awful night in benghazi when four people were killed. the administration spun two separate stories, we still don't know the narrative. all that, the "kudlow report" starts right now. >>> first up tonight, it could prove to be the most significant immigration reform in years. bipartisan group of four democratic and four republican senators unveiling their blueprint this afternoon for border security, guest worker cards, more foreign brainiacs and employer verification, maybe even a path to citizenship. cnbc's own eamon javers joins us now with the details. good evening, eamon. >> well, we've almost gotten out of practice at watching bipartisan groups of senators hold press conferences here in washington. that's not something we're used to seeing. in recent months, anyway. but the sena
? the private economy did well up 3.4%. it was the government economy that fell. i would like to see us finishing the spending cuts of the government. shrink the government more. grow the private economy by 5%. that is my vision. now there is more bad news for new jersey senator bob menendez as the fbi raids the offices of one of his close financial backers. will it present key evidence in the alleged prostitution scandal surrounding the senator. it's all unconfirmed but the potential legal fallout is huge. >>> israel takes no chances. the air force launches two air strikes in syria preventing the assad regime from transporting chemicals and weapons of mass destruction to hezbollah. if the red line is crossed israel will attack again. we cover it all. "the kudlow report" begins now. first up we learned today the fourth quarter gdp fell slightly, much to everybody's surprise. so the white house is blaming republicans for the fiscal tax cliff and the spending sequester which i think is hilarious. they invented the sequester. we have had tax, spend and regulate policies for four years. why
is a senior fellow at our global economy, and i will sit with him and asking a few questions. and then we will turn to questions over to you, the audience. we will have simultaneous translation. my mother, may she rest in piece, is a greek language teacher. she will be rolling in a great asset to my own good piece on. so without i give you alexis tsipras. [applause] >> please join your piece to number two for the translation. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: i want to express our opinions, our view on the cause of the crisis, and our vision for the necessary changes that have to take place in greece. so that we can change from becoming guinea pigs of the crisis to the country that will serve as the starting point for new, progressive changes that will lead the worldwide economy to safe harbors. and so it is a special honor for me to be here at brookings. this is a foundation with strong traditions and document conversation with facts. this is a foundation that and cn understand what's at stake, both in greece and in europe today. when i was young i remember those older than me t
a strong middle class and offer working folks new pathways to rise into the middle class. our economy is in the a better position than tomorrow that most other countries hit by the financial crisis. i a understand tim is ready for a break. obviously we are sad to see him go. but i cannot think of a better person to continue his work at treasury that -- than the jack lew. this is bittersweet because not only is 10 leaving the jacket and my chief of staff for the last year. was my budget director before that. i trust his judgment, value his friendship, and know very few people would give greater integrity than the man to my left. i don't want to see him go because it is working out well for me to have him in the white house, but my loss will be the nation's game. jack has the distinction of having worked and succeeded in some of the toughest jobs in washington and the private sector. as a congressional staffer in the 1980's, he helped negotiate the deal between president reagan and tip o'neill. under president clinton, he presided over three budget surpluses in a row. for all of this ta
this out. a lot of things are state base silly laws. but don't impact the economy . last year was an election year, we have a small number of regulations that are hitting us. >> you bring up an interesting point. emac, the's new list of regulations that are 77,000 pages was issued on the friday beforehristmas. trying to get buried in the holidays. >> it was released between april and october. these rules are going to cost the economy 128 billion . that is it one estimate out there. even russian czar said i don't rule russia. my miniczar's do. ch has it right. burrcrats are justifying and creating new rules . and i talk to them. they have to hire their own burrcrat to dole with the government burrcrats. >> emac said you need new administrators and czars. >> maybe it would add jobs. but it is important to point out regulations are necessary. even governor romne said that . porly -- case in point. oregon is coming out with a law that makes employers not discriminate against unemployed applicants that is it important. we have seen discrimination there. that is good for the economy
as we near the 1500 mark on the s&p 500. and a 0.1% contraction is expected for the german economy in the fourth quarter. those figures will be out in just under 30 minutes. >>> the governors of the banks of italy -- trade in siena. and imf's christine legarde tells us that central bank stimulus is still needed. >> we have the central bank on the one hand which have done quite a lot, which have been the fireman, in a way. and you have the policymakers on the other hand particularly in the eurozone who have made some progress and need to keep the momentum. >> now, any minute now, we're expecting the results from germany's ifo institute. january business climate index survey is expected to rise to a reading of 103 from 102.4 in december. this, of course, follows an increase in expectations in the dew survey earlier this week. we've seen an increase in the pmi surveys for germany over the last couple of months. as the german economy particularly looking to climb out of its contraction in the fourth quarter, we're waiting on the ifo senior va to tell us whether sentiment broadly speaki
in a bipartisan way and avoiding a middle-class tax hike that could throw the economy back into a recession. 97% of small businesses will not see their income taxes go up one dime. we maid sure that millions of families will continue to see tax credits. companies will continue to receive tax breaks for the research they do, investments they make, and the clean energy jobs they make. two million americans that are out of work will continue to receive unemployment benefits as long as they are actively looking for a job. we still need to do more to put americans back to work while also putting this country on a path to pay down its debt. our economy can't afford more showdowns on the manufacturing crisis along the way. even as our businesses created two million new jobs last year, including 168,000 jobs last month the dysfunction in congress made consumers less confident. we know there is a path forward. i signed into a law a deaf reduction. this week's action further reduces the deaf -- deficit. i'm willing to do more. i believe we can find more places to cut spending without short-changing thing
the wrong way. the economy slinks bringing on fears of a new recession. this is "special report." ♪ ♪ >> bret: good evening. i'm bret baier. hard slap in the face tonight from reality. economy thought to be improving shocked experts and shrank in the final months of last year. huge falloff from gain last summer. white house correspondent wendell goler with an explanation and reaction. >> less than two weeks after the president said in the second inaugural address that an economic recovery had begun, the commerce department said not so fast. the biggest drop in defense spending in 40 years combined with a decline in exports and slow growth in company stock piles slashed economic growth from 3.1% in the third quarter to minus 1/10th in the fourth. first negative quarter since 2009. white house downplayed the report and gave the republicans part of the blame. >> home prices are starting to climb back. consumer confidence overall has been rising and consumer spending is rising. but there is more work to do. our economy is facing a major head wind that goes to your point. republi
economy and, brother, it is so grim. u.s. economy unexpectedly shrinking in the fourth quarter. the biggest dip in 3 years. instead of jumping into high gear to figure out what to do to reverse this economic bad news some, top democrats used their time to play the blame game. they say it's all the republicans' fault. >> the economy shrunk. >> last three months of last year, our economy shrunk. >> the new report suggests that this economy still has not really fully recovered from the financial crisis four years ago. >> it was the democrats are saying? this is the best-looking contraction that there has ever been. >> it's disheartening, although we have moved at least temporarily beyond flirtation with default, to see republican leaders say, visequester in my back pocket. it's not a game. it's the american economy. >> you remember what this administration's growth forecasts were? for the next three to four years? their growth forecasts were anywhere between 3 and 4/2 percent. we are not growing. >> have you heard of a poor man spending himself into prosperity? >> it's just sad to
is on. tonight: the economy is still in neutral gear. >> amazing job though convincing people that things are rosy. >> bill: bad news for the u.s. economy. it is going down again. even as president obama's poll numbers are going up are we the people completely clueless? we have a special report. you al gore are doing business with this country that's enabling your ultimate foe climate change. >> i think i understand what you are getting at. [ laughter ] >> bill: even david letterman is pounding al goren othe hypocrisy of making money from big oil. we will show you how gore is being treated by the left-wing media. >> isn't there a contradiction in that? also tonight dennis miller on the most popular tv personalities in america and my interview with collin powell last night. caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. >> bill: hi, i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. bad economic news but it doesn't seem to matter to the folks. that is the sung of this evening's talking points memo. last quarter, the economy fell back. in fact, it
. >> on to business news now, the german economy contracted in the final quarter of last year as the eurozone crisis took its toll, but europe's biggest economy still managed to post modest growth of 0.7%. >> that may not sound like much, but it is more than you expect from most eurozone economies. >> the eurozone crisis has not been able to dampen the mood among eurozone consumers. they are still hitting shops and helping the economy grow modestly. >> despite big increases in the cost of energy, raw materials, and oil, private consumption is up. that is the first reason. the second is that the german economy remained competitive last year despite a weaker environment, and that has given exports a boost. >> exports are the backbone of the german economy. they continued to grow last year, albeit at a slower rate. companies are proceeding with caution. they are cutting investment amid uncertainty about what the new year will hold, especially for the eurozone. in 2011, the german economy grew by 3%. that figure dropped to 0.7% last year. the economy even contracted in the final quarter. the government
are going to cost the economy 128 billion . that is it one estimate out there. even russian czar said i don't rule russia. my miniczar's do. rich has it right. burrcrats are justifying and creating new rules . and i talk to them. they have to hire their own burrcrat to dole with the government burrcrats. >> emac said you need new administrators and czars. >> maybe it would add jobs. but it is important to point out regulations are necessary. even governor romney said that . porly -- case in point. oregon is coming out with a law that makes employers not discriminate against unemployed applicants that is it important. we have seen discrimination there. that is good for the economy. >> steve, you can always justify thingings. but the bottom line regulations are a tax on business. are they not? >> they are indeed and people who love regulations make it a choice between anarchy and reguleses. in term of job creation and having bankings. i know a midsize bank had to hire a thousand people of compliiance and that means fewer loan officers. regulations are a burden pure and simple . the p.m. claim
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 4,791 (some duplicates have been removed)